Validity of pervasive computing based continuous physical activity assessment in community-dwelling old and oldest-old

Narayan Schütz, Hugo Saner, Beatrice Rudin, Angela Botros, Bruno Pais, Valérie Santschi, Philipp Buluschek, Daniel Gatica-Perez, Prabitha Urwyler, Laura Marchal-Crespo, René M. Müri & Tobias Nef

Abstract

In older adults, physical activity is crucial for healthy aging and associated with numerous health indicators and outcomes. Regular assessments of physical activity can help detect early health-related changes and manage physical activity targeted interventions. The quantification of physical activity, however, is difficult as commonly used self-reported measures are biased and rather unprecise point in time measurements. Modern alternatives are commonly based on wearable technologies which are accurate but suffer from usability and compliance issues. In this study, we assessed the potential of an unobtrusive ambient-sensor based system for continuous, long-term physical activity quantification. Towards this goal, we analysed one year of longitudinal sensor- and medical-records stemming from thirteen community-dwelling old and oldest old subjects. Based on the sensor data the daily number of room-transitions as well as the raw sensor activity were calculated. We did find the number of room-transitions, and to some degree also the raw sensor activity, to capture numerous known associations of physical activity with cognitive, well-being and motor health indicators and outcomes. The results of this study indicate that such low-cost unobtrusive ambient-sensor systems can provide an adequate approximation of older adults’ overall physical activity, sufficient to capture relevant associations with health indicators and outcomes.

Introduction

It is commonly known and widely accepted that physical activity positively influences health. There is strong scientific evidence that physical activity reduces the risk for a variety of health outcomes like high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, cancer, weight gain, falls, depression, loss of cognitive function or functional ability in seniors1,2. While these findings are of high relevance for all age groups, they are of special importance for the growing number of old and even more so for the oldest-old adults – especially since physical activity is a modifiable risk factor3,4. In addition, seniors are more likely to suffer from chronic diseases, experience falls or face significant cognitive decline. They are also more prone to a sedentary lifestyle5 and results of cardiorespiratory fitness measures even suggest an age-related acceleration in decline6, which might also be detectable by physical activity.

While it is evident that moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity is usually better, research suggests that light- and moderate-intensity physical activity is still better than no physical activity in terms of health benefits2. This is important for seniors as they may often find it difficult to engage in high-intensity physical activities such as running or aerobic exercise. Light- and moderate-intensity physical activities like cooking, vacuuming or other everyday activities, constitute an important and often integral part in older adult’s total physical activity. Measuring this type of physical activity is rather difficult but may be very important for the early detection of preventable physical activity decline or to monitor the course of interventions. Today, physical activity assessments are often based on self-reporting which is not only prone to response bias but also suffers from recall bias – especially with declining memory4,7,8,9. Frequently used alternatives are accelerometer or pedometer based7,10. While these provide objective physical activity measures in free-living conditions, they must be worn, which becomes cumbersome in long-term assessments of several months or even years and is thus often accompanied by wear-time dependent non-compliance issues10.

Advances in technology made pervasive computing feasible for technology assisted healthy aging by embedding smart microprocessor-driven computing devices in everyday objects (as for instance seen in appliances of smart homes)11. A growing body of groundbreaking research shows that such systems are not only feasible and well accepted by seniors but are also useful for the detection of emergency situations or early changes in health status9,12,13. A frequently used and increasingly commercialized technology is passive infrared (PIR) motion sensing, which is both inexpensive and unobtrusive, to an extent that people tend to forget about it14,15. In this context, PIR motion sensors work by detecting the presence of a person’s motion in an equipped room16. Besides safety applications17,18,19,20, most work in this direction primarily targeted cognitive outcomes. Galambos et al. for instance showed that changes in PIR-sensor derived motion density maps correspond to exacerbations of depression and dementia21. In a similar manner Hayes et al. demonstrated that variability in PIR-sensor derived activity and gait-speed data differed between cognitively normal subjects and those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI)22. Similarly, Urwyler et al. highlighted the difference between sensor derived activities of daily living patterns in healthy and MCI subjects23.

In this work, we assess the potential of PIR-sensors in the light of physical activity. In particular, we explore the validity and potential of unobtrusive, continuous PIR-sensor readings for physical activity quantification, targeting in-home light- and moderate-intensity physical activity. Towards this goal, we analyzed the behavior of PIR-sensor based (physical) activity metrics and compared them with a multitude of cognitive, well-being and motor-function related assessments to see whether this approximation to physical activity sufficiently captures known effects of physical activity on commonly used health indicators and outcomes. The data for the analysis stems from a naturalistic sample of thirteen community dwelling old and oldest-old Swiss subjects (age = 90.9 ± 4.3 years, female = 69.23%) from the StrongAge cohort in Olten (Switzerland). All analyzed subjects shared the same apartment layout. The subjects were monitored for the duration of one year. Simultaneously, a battery of standardized clinical tests and assessments were performed repeatedly. The resulting data was aggregated and analyzed in terms of baseline differences. In addition, physical activity data from a subject with rapid health decline was evaluated and visualized in a case study format.

Results

Over roughly one year, more than 89’389 person-hours were recorded from the homes of thirteen old and oldest-old participants (age = 90.9 ± 4.3 years) (Table 1), all sharing the same apartment layout and sensor placement. During the same period, classic assessments of multiple health outcomes have been assessed. Two normalized PIR-sensor derived measures of physical activity were calculated. First, the daily sensor activity – measuring the time the sensors were detecting activity (Equation (1)). Second, the normalized daily number of room-transitions (measuring the hourly number of transitions between different rooms) (Equation (2)). Here, we present the resulting associations and observations between these sensor-based physical activity metrics and the classic clinical assessments (Fig. 1).

Figure 1

Visual Correlation Matrix of the four sensor-derived physical activity metrics and the clinical assessments). Shown is a visual representationh of the respective correlations as measured by the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients (ρ) based on an α = 0.05i. The sensor-derived physical activity metrics (rows) represent the mean and the coefficient of variation (CV) of the daily measurements over the whole monitoring duration. The size as well as colour-intensity signal the correlation strength, where red means a strong positive and blue a strong negative correlation. aTimed Up & Go (TUG)27 (Counting = while additionally counting backwards from 100; Cup = while holding a full cup of water). bGeriatric Depression Scale (GDS)25cTinetti Performance-oriented mobility assessment (POMA)28dMontreal cognitive assessment (MoCA)24eKnee extensor strength (Knee). fHip flexor strength (Hip). gVisual analogue scale: measuring perceived health based on the EQ-5D-3L system (EQ-VAS)26hcreated using the R package “corrplot”34 i*<0.05; **<0.01.

READ THE ARTICLE

Partager cet article

Partager sur facebook
Partager sur linkedin
Partager sur twitter
Partager sur email

Le produit a été ajouté au panier

Veuillez patienter, vous allez être redirigé

Montre d’appel d’urgence homme

L’avantage de la montre connectée par rapport au bracelet d’alerte est sa discrétion. Légère et simple d’utilisation, elle permet de faire accepter l’idée d’urgence et de sécurité aux personnes qui sont attachées au port d’une montre.

  • Cuir véritable noir
  • Bouton d’appel facilement accessible
  • Boitier en acier inox noir
  • Etanche aux projections d’eau
  • 45mm x 36mm x 11mm
  • Durée de la batterie: 2 ans
Prix unitaire
CHF
179.00
Prix avec abonnement
CHF
90.00

Vous avez des questions ?

Demandez à l'un de nos conseiller de vous appeler.

Vous avez besoin d’assistance dans votre commande ou une question sur l’un de nos kits ? Nos conseillers sont là pour vous aider ! Entrez simplement le numéro sur lequel nous pouvons vous contacter.


Validity of pervasive computing based continuous physical activity assessment in community-dwelling old and oldest-old

Coût unique
CHF
0
coût mensuel
CHF
0
/mois
(Frais d'installation
0
)

La station de base

Une fois connectée à une prise électrique, la station de base est opérationnelle pour demander de l’aide en tout temps, jour et nuit, même si vous n’arrivez pas à parler. Il suffit d’appuyer sur le bouton d’alerte de la station ou celui que vous portez en montre, en médaillon ou en bracelet.

L’interphone intégré à la station d’alerte permet d’être en contact direct avec les proches ou la centrale d’alerte médicale 24h/24 et 7j/7, qui peut évaluer la situation et faire intervenir les secours en cas de besoin.

appels-cascade-squared.jpg

Alerte des proches

Lorsque l’alarme est déclenchée, les proches préalablement définis reçoivent un message automatique sur l’application mobile DomoSafety qu’ils auront installée sous iOS ou Android. Simultanément, le système commence à appeler les répondants dans l’ordre dans lequel ils ont été renseignés jusqu’à ce que l’appel soit pris: si le premier ne répond pas, le système appelle le deuxième et ainsi de suite (jusqu’à trois répondants). Ceci permet aux proches d’être mis en contact vocal avec la personne ou de se rendre sur place pour faire la levée de doute et organiser les secours en cas de besoin. Si le système ne constate aucune réponse après avoir fait trois fois le tour de la liste des proches, il s’arrête d’appeler.

abonnement mensuel
CHF
29.-
/mois
Abonnements

Centrale d'appels d'urgence

L’alarme d’urgence est gérée par notre centrale médicale qui est à l’écoute 24h sur 24, 7 jours sur 7. Elle effectue une levée de doute en rappelant la personne sur l’interphone de la station de base qui décroche automatiquement. En cas de déclenchement d’alarme, la centrale envoie dans la messagerie de l’application mobile une information suite à leur prise en charge. Si c’est un problème grave, elle appelle d’abord la famille ou le proche puis les secours et fait le suivi jusqu’à leur arrivée.

abonnement mensuel
CHF
49.-
/mois

L’application mobile gratuite pour rester connecté et informé

L’application de liaison DOMO réceptionne les alarmes d’urgence ainsi que les commentaires de la centrale médicale qui informe, par exemple, où la personne a été hospitalisée. Une messagerie sécurisée permet d’échanger des informations avec les différents intervenants, famille ou proches-aidants.

Selon la solution choisie, cette application intelligente offre aux proches-aidants ou aux soignants également la possibilité de suivre le rythme de vie et la santé de la personne âgée à tout moment, dans le but de proposer des soins adaptés.

Bouton d’alarme standard

Simple et fiable le bouton d’alerte à porter en bracelet ou en pendentif fonctionne rapidement et de manière efficace avec la station de base. En restant à portée de main, une simple pression sur un bouton suffit pour mettre en place la chaîne d’appels d’urgence adaptée à la situation. Vous êtes toujours en sécurité.

  • Portée 300 mètres
  • 100% étanche
  • Autonomie de 5 ans
Prix unitaire
CHF
30.00
Prix avec abonnement
CHF
0.00

Montre d’appel d’urgence femme

L’avantage de la montre connectée par rapport au bracelet d’alerte est sa discrétion. Légère et simple d’utilisation, elle permet de faire accepter l’idée d’urgence et de sécurité aux personnes qui sont attachées au port d’une montre.

  • Cuir véritable marron
  • Bouton d’appel facilement accessible
  • Boitier en acier inox doré rose
  • Etanche aux projections d’eau
  • 41mm x 32mm x 11mm
  • Durée de la batterie: 2 ans


Prix unitaire
CHF
179.00
Prix avec abonnement
CHF
90.00

Vous avez besoin de services infirmiers avec un suivi de santé personnalisé ?

En complément de la solution DOMO Santé, nous pouvons mettre à disposition un service de suivi médical par une infirmière ou un infirmier diplômé-e permettant d’éviter les hospitalisations et les coûts élevés d’hébergement en EMS.

Cette prestation comprend :

Appelez le +41 58 800 58 00 pour parler avec l’un de nos conseillers qui vous guidera dans vos choix et répondra à toutes vos questions.

CHF 140.-/mois

Médaillon d'alarme rouge

Combinez le style d’un médaillon élégant avec la sécurité du bouton d’alerte connecté qui peut vous sauver la vie en cas d’urgence sur un simple pression. Profitez de la vie en toute liberté et sans compromis !

  • Chaîne argentée en acier inoxydable
  • Portée d’environ 200 mètres
  • Etanche
  • Durée de la batterie: 5 ans
Prix unitaire
CHF
149.00
Prix avec abonnement
CHF
80.00

Médaillon d'alarme bleu

Combinez le style d’un médaillon élégant avec la sécurité du bouton d’alerte connecté qui peut vous sauver la vie en cas d’urgence sur un simple pression. Profitez de la vie en toute liberté et sans compromis !

  • Chaîne argentée en acier inoxydable
  • Portée d’environ 200 mètres
  • Etanche
  • Durée de la batterie: 5 ans
Prix unitaire
CHF
149.00
Prix avec abonnement
CHF
80.00

Capteur de présence dans le lit

Grâce au détecteur de présence placé sous le matelas, il est possible de détecter une chute, un malaise, ainsi qu’un non–retour au lit pendant la nuit, et d’alerter les proches ou la centrale d’appel d’urgence.

Capteur-Domo-Sommeili.png

Set de capteurs de présence

Le système se compose d’un réseau de capteurs de 4 détecteurs de mouvements placés discrètement dans les pièces du logement, d’un capteur de présence placé sous le matelas et d’un capteur de porte. Notre système intelligent identifie une situation inhabituelle et envoi une alerte à la centrale d’appel d’urgence, à un membre de la famille ou à un référent de soins, notamment à l’absence anormale de mouvement en cas de chute à la salle de bain, un non-retour au lit pendant la nuit ou quand la personne s’absente de son domicile. 

Le système respecte l’intimité et la vie privée de la personne – pas de caméra, ni de micros – il est compatible avec la présence d’animaux domestiques et ne nécessite aucuns travaux d’installation ni d’entretien. 

Set de détecteurs

Rapport de santé

Cette approche s’inscrit dans l’objectif d’une médecine proactive et préventive, spécialement appropriée pour des personnes fragilisées par des maladies chroniques telles que les maladies cardiovasculaires, Alzheimer, le diabète, l’arthrose, etc.

Elle se traduit par de nombreux avantages:

Dispositif de santé

Ce capteur, placé sous le matelas, analyse à distance trois paramètres physiologiques, essentiels pour le suivi d’une bonne santé :

  • La qualité du sommeil
  • La fréquence respiratoire
  • La fréquence cardiaque

Ces paramètres sont importants à suivre dans le cadre d’une détérioration de la santé ou simplement pour savoir si le rythme de vie de son proche est normal. Par exemple, la fréquence respiratoire ou le rythme cardiaque sont importants à suivre en cas de problèmes de cœur ou de poumon.

Capteur-Lit

Nos boutons d’alarme

Simple et fiable le bouton d’alarme à porter en montre, en médaillon ou en bracelet fonctionne rapidement et de manière efficace avec la station de base. En restant à portée de main, une simple pression sur un bouton suffit pour mettre en place la chaîne d’appels d’urgence adaptée à la situation.
Vous êtes toujours en sécurité.

Boutons_Alarme.png

Télécharger un exemple de rapport

Entrez votre adresse email et recevez immédiatement un exemple de rapport au format PDF par email.